How making a Coloring Book helped me through a Stressful Time in Life & How it Can Help Us Now

[Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases such as links to my coloring book on this page. It’s one of the ways I support my site.]

 

In 2015, my stress level was off the charts. My dad had Alzheimer's – he didn't know who I was but I believe he knew I was one of “his people”: someone who was around and looking out for him.

I had a creative business but was lacking creativity – it was all going into figuring out how to weather the storm, anticipate and respond to changes in his needs and care and also take care of myself so I could help take care of him.

As I'm writing, the world finds itself in the grips of COVID-19 or the Coronavirus. Schools are closed. People are being asked to stay home to flatten the curve and stop the spread.

 

We are using every skill we have – and some have more than others – to mentally survive the fear of the health and economic ramifications to ourselves, our community and our nations.

COLORING is a simple way to help decrease your stress level.

There are many benefits of Coloring for Grown Ups:

  1. It's relaxing and forces you to unplug from coloring. (coloring apps obviously don't do that!)
  2. It's easy – you don't need to be an artist, you just need colors and paper – pre-printed pages to color optional. (CLICK HERE for 2 free pages from my Coloring Book!)
  3. It's creative – coloring activates the right side of the brain by the mere act of moving the pen, pencil or crayons. (Don't let the word “creative” stress you out – you've got it in you!)
  4. It's an active meditation that causes your brain to focus – more on that below.

 

Coloring stimulates the right side of the brain – where your creativity, intuition and visualization lies. More importantly – the action of coloring requires focus which is regulated by the frontal lobe of the brain (the area responsible for executive functioning).

According to BrainFacts.org, “…anxiety is the result of constant chatter between a number of different brain regions — a fear network. No one brain region drives anxiety on its own. Instead, interactions among many brain areas are all important for how we experience anxiety.”

A lot of people suffer from anxiety on a regular basis and even more now. Trying to find ways to stop the chatter is key and for me and many others – coloring helps!

Stress levels go down and feelings of peace and happiness increase. Because coloring is a great way to shift the brain's attention and focus, it is a great activity during times of stress or just to maintain peace of mind.

Art Therapy and coloring helps VETS with PTSD.

Beaumont Health System in Michigan says coloring can help:

  • Reduce stress and anxiety
  • improve motor skills and vision
  • improve sleep &
  • improve focus

Coloring is a great activity to share with a loved one with dementia or Alzheimer’s or for them to do alone. Since it doesn’t rely on recalling learned knowledge or memories, it is an activity that people can do longer into the disease.

Try different types of coloring books or coloring pages to see what level of detail keeps you engaged without becoming frustrating. Colored pens or pencils are better for intricate designs.

P.S. If you color the free pages or any from my book I’d love to see them!

Tag me on Instagram: @artisttarareed
Share it on Pinterest: pinterest.com/artisttarareed

Here's to using creativity for stress relief and peace of mind!

– Tara Reed

You might also like the Color Yourself Happy lined Journals – also available on Amazon.

Use permanent markers to color the front and back of the journals – insides include 100 lined pages.

Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. It’s one of the ways I support my site.

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